Types of Tea

BLACK TEA: THE MOST WELL-KNOWN VARIETY OF TEA IN THE WEST.

Known as "red tea" in China, black tea leaves are fully oxidized. In the case of most black teas, younger leaves are picked before being withered, rolled, fully oxidized, and fired. While created originally in China, black teas are now cultivated worldwide. Some of the most famous black teas come from the Indian regions of Assam, Darjeeling, and Nilgiri as well as Sri Lanka.

Black teas are usually fermented between 60% and 80% and are processed using specialized techniques that bring out unique and satisfying aromas, tastes, and colors. When brewed, the tea color ranges from dark brown to a gorgeous deep red. Some Black teas are robust and woodsy, while others are delicate with a perfume-like fragrance that fills the room.

 

CHAI TEA: A SPICED MILK TEA, IS A CENTURIES-OLD BEVERAGE ORIGINATING IN INDIA.

Rich black tea leaves are paired with warm spices (the most common being cardamom), milk and sweetener to produce a bold flavor and fragrant aroma.

GREEN TEAS: BECAUSE THEY ARE UN-OXIDIZED, GREEN TEAS RETAIN THEIR VITAL COLOR

Varying finishing methods result in a world of flavors and aromas, from toasty to sweet. In Japan, sencha teas are quickly steamed at high temperatures after harvesting to preserve their distinctive bright, vegetal flavor. Hoji teas are lightly roasted rewarding the tea drinker with a toasty finish that’s lower in caffeine content. Gyokuro teas are shaded before harvesting resulting in a precious jade-colored infusion and a breathtaking range of flavors…the epitome of refinement. In China, green teas are roasted or pan-fired which tends to bring out a mouthwatering range of flavors from citrus-like to smoky with a lighter body.

Green teas are known for their health-giving qualities, have a mild, cleansing astringency, are toasty, slightly sweet and have a chestnut-like flavor.

 

HERBAL TEA: BEYOND THE WORLD OF TEA, THERE EXISTS A WHOLE RANGE

of floral and herbal infusions with their own delicately layered flavors and aromas. We have selected a variety of tisanes from all over the world that are entirely caffeine-free, so you can enjoy them all day long.

Infusing flowers, herbs or other plant materials in hot water makes herbal teas, also called tisanes. They are aromatic, flavorful, healthful and delicious, ideal for those seeking an elegant, caffeine-free beverage.

OOLONG TEAS: SEMI-OXIDIZED.

For that reason, they are often thought of as a bridge between green and black teas. Oolong teas have long been cultivated in both mainland China and Taiwan. Crafted from larger, mature leaves, they are allowed to oxidize between 10% to 80%. Often, different tea estates have their preferred ways of making oolong tea. It is because of the intricacy of this process that oolong teas can have the widest array of flavors and aromas, from a flowery to fruity finish. Furthermore, oolongs can be steeped several times, with each successive infusion having its own distinctive taste and fragrance.

Varied and rich floral aromas and unique flavors are complex, resembling coffee or wine in their many varied expressions. Oolongs are beautiful and flavorful teas enjoyed worldwide by tea lovers.

WELLNESS TEAS: ESPECIALLY REMARKABLE.

This is a personalized selection of wellness tea, meticulously grown, harvested and prepared to bring you moments of simple pleasure when you need it most. We invite you to experience our treasury of wellness teas.

WHITE TEAS: AN AURA OF HARMONIOUS PURITY ABOUT THEM

because they are dried naturally and undergo the least processing of all teas. Traditionally cultivated in China, white tea was picked only a few days out of the year, when a white down, known as bai hao, appeared on the tender shoots. The tea shoots are allowed to wither then dry to prevent oxidization. This process is a delicate one, requiring strict attention from the tea makers.

White Tea is loved for its light creamy flavor, natural sweetness, and delicate, floral aromas. These health-giving teas contain high levels of Antioxidants and Polyphenols.